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Of networks and hubs

In his book Linked , Albert-Laszlo Barabasi stresses the importance of hubs--the most prominent nodes--in networks. In a social network, these are the highly connected individuals who keep the network together; in a food economy such as Grinnell's or Fairfield's these are the large businesses that dominate the market. Barabasi discusses how scale-free networks--those networks that are not random and have some nodes that are much more important than others--are at once robust against failure and vulnerable to attack. They are robust against internal failure because they can function without the small nodes that are disproportionately affected by such failure, but are vulnerable to an attack aimed at the hubs of the network. Do these local food economies follow the network rules that Barabasi establishes? Would the removal of a small business in Grinnell go relatively unnoticed, while the destruction of Walmart would leave the market in tatters?